Create to Grow: the key to power success, by M. Eisner

Jun 18 2009

“To punish failure is to encourage mediocrity”

Highlights

  • Usually it seems more safe to do the same thing it has been done before.
  • Innovation isn’t easy, but that is OK.
  • Compare a project with a box. The box can be big or small but should be in accordance with a realistic business plan and financial return.


Micromanagement

  • Micromanagement is the best path to effective management because it effectively links the person in the top to every person in the process.
  • Creativity can deal with apparently unsolvable financial problems.
  • If you care about every point (of the picture) taking attention on the hole picture, you get great results.
  • Micromanagement is about keeping your eyes open.
  • Micromanagement also requires failure.
  • Once human filters are in place the possibilities will be endless.

Risk

  • The more times you fail, the closer you are to success.
  • People are afraid to take risk.
  • The world has become a single dot. We are all standing at the point of a needle.

Media

  • Internet has taken budget necessary for projects to extremely lower level, leaving creativity as the only meaningful variable.
  • Each media has its strength and weaknesses.
  • What matters is the quality of the content.
  • Whatever your business stands for, the best way to archive the best long term results is to look inside your box.

Extract by Josep Oriol Ayats and Guillem Mateos.


CEO’s Panel Discussion

Jun 18 2009

“How do you get companies to innovate?”

Moderator: Jennifer Schenker

Michael Eisner

  • You have to constantly challenge the people that work with you.
  • There is a change going on in home video.
  • Music industry is going through a metamorphosis which is still not figured out.
  • Bigger is better (business).
  • If you are bigger and you are innovator, you have the financial resources to do things and do them fast.
  • Basically people want to please the boss.
  • Its essential how the CEO chooses the head of departments.
  • Inertia overrides innovation in successful organizations.
  • Put people in a room till they are so annoyed and so tired and so upset until they have a new idea. Keep going on till you are upset.
  • There are thousands of good ideas, the problem is recognizing them.
  • There are a thousand reasons why a good idea dies.
  • If you want to innovate the last thing to do is research.
  • If you are not prepared to lose, you are not going to take the right hand of risk.

Eric Weber

  • Its very difficult to put an equation to innovation.
  • Many organizations are just too short on their patience.
  • Individuals tend to work for companies where they fit.
  • Measuring innovation has always been a challenge.

Extract by Josep Oriol Ayats and Guillem Mateos.


Time to get answers!

Jun 12 2009

On June 17th Hit Barcelona brings together five of the most prominent business gurus for a unique day of top-level conferences, addressing critical topics in the current global economic uncertainty.

Get involved in the programme and ask Gary Hamel, Michael Eisner, Ray Kurzweil, Vijay Govindarajan or Rosabeth Moss-Kanter your questions directly via the following link: http://www.hitbarcelona.com/questions.

Each expert will answer the most voted for questions live during their session, you can follow their answers on HiT Barcelona’s blog and Twitter/HITBCN.

Don’t miss this opportunity, get online and get answers!

Sign Inn here to ask



Michael Eisner: media and entertainment success

Jun 09 2009

Michael Eisner is the former chief executive officer of the Walt Disney Company and the man generally considered responsible for Disney’s monumental success in the 1990s.

michael_eisner

How answers.com explains, during the 1970s and early ’80s Eisner earned his reputation as a keen businessman, first as a programming director for ABC television and then as president of Paramount movie studios.

In September, 1984, Michael Eisner became Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of  The Walt Disney Company. Since the death of Walt Disney in 1966, the studio had continued to enjoy periodic box office successes, and to earn profits from its theme parks and merchandising, but many in the industry felt the company was suffering from a lack of direction. Within a few years, Eisner transformed the company into a media giant whose interests included movies, sports franchises, theme parks and television networks.

After a downhill in the late ’90s and leaving Disney, Michael Eisner has founded The Tornante Company (the name comes from the Italian for “hairpin turn”) to invest in and develop companies in the media and entertainment sector. Tornante holdings range from Team Baby Entertainment and the Internet television company Veoh Network, to the Topps bubblegum and trading card company.

In 2006, Michael Eisner hosted his own business and entertainment interview program, Conversations With Michael Eisner on the CNBC television network.