Health Care 2.0

Abr 30 2010

Health Care (image from: michigan.gov)

Health Care (image from: michigan.gov)

Some economists say pessimism is slowing job creation and likely weakening the recovery. So, on a more positive note, it’s worth underlining that early-stage investors are still placing bets.

According to Forbes.com, they are looking at Internet, Software, Electronics, Mobile and Communications, Energy and Utilities, and Health Care. Therefore, being in the right sector can make all the difference. For the record, CB Insights enhances that Health Care was the most popular one among venture capitals in the fourth quarter (2009), attracting $1.8 billion spread over 167 deals.

The above mentioned article also states that there is a clear recovery taking place right now in the biotech arena. Moreover, the Internet and digital medical information are having a major disruptive effect on the practice of medicine. Some experts predict in 10 years’ time remote care will keep patients healthy and at home. What do all these changes mean for the Health Care Industry, globally speaking and taking into account Inflatable Tent the long-awaited Health Care reform in the US?

Some of these topics were discussed in the e-Health week conference, held in Barcelona last March, and in the Health 2.0 congress, held in Paris, a few weeks ago. In her blog, Cristina Ribas points out some conclusions worth to be shared. The 2.0 Health Care products success depends on integration of data from private and public services, access to specialized communities and personalized content and some kind of virtual assistance.

What do you think about it? What’s next for Health Care? HitBarcelona offers you an ideal environment to discuss it. The congress will also bring together well-known experts of the sector, who will reveal the latest investment trends and explain where and how to invest. Will you miss this opportunity?


Green Is Gold

Abr 14 2010

cleantech

Source: investincleantech.net

I was in the seventies and even in the beginning of the twenty-first century. But it is not only related to “alternative”, altruistic environmentalists or lab scientists anymore. Cleantech has eventually entered the financial or business community’s lexicon… Through the front door.

A Google search for the word shows more than 1.5 million results. Among them, a three-part series of San Jose Mercury News from a couple of months ago, highlighting that the sector is poised to be “not just the next big thing but perhaps the biggest thing ever”. Numbers speak by themselves. “Confronting the peril of greenhouse gases and climate change happens to be a multi-trillion-dollar business opportunity”, states the report.

Venture capitalists are in. Investment in the Cleantech Industry grew from $908 million in 2002 to $8.5 billion in 2008 and California garnered 40% of the world’s funding in 2009. It sounds promising. Nevertheless, the Mercury warns that the US is quickly falling behind and underlines that the Silicon Valley’s “ability to innovate its way to the top in cleantech is far from guaranteed”. Competition is fierce and global.

The Mercury shows how China has already overtaken the lead in key markets such as solar, which was led by Spain in 2008, with 2.51 gigawatts installed that year alone, according to a report from the European Photovoltaic Industry Association (EPIA).

On the other hand, a JP Morgan report last year said South Korea is going to be one of the fastest growing solar markets during the next four years. And last but not least: According to the Fundació Fòrum Ambiental, in Catalonia, the sector is still growing 3%-4% despite the crisis. Cards are dealt. HitBarcelona counts with a great bunch of experts to talk about the opportunities in the Cleantech industry. Do you want to join in?